Ad-d sensitivity to your brand

Do you remember Amul Macho’s ‘Yeh toh bada toing hain’? The TV commercial had done enough damage before it was banned. After all, what purpose did it serve showing a woman wash a man’s undergarment and feeling aroused about it? The ad makers clearly goofed by demeaning women. Thankfully, there is an increasing clamour against stereotyping or objectification of women. And the recent spate of women-centric ads are cases in point.

Be it Cadbury Bournvita’s ‘Tayyari Jeet Ki’, Tupperware’s ‘She can you can’, or Havells Fan’s ‘Hawa Badlegi’, these ads clearly hold on to the changing face of Indian society. The first shows a mother lead by example and groom her child to succeed. The second is about a small-town woman taking pride in her career. And the third is a heartwarming portrayal of a man taking on his wife’s last name. The three ads are among the winners of the fifth edition of Laadli Media and Advertising Awards for Gender Sensitivity.

While trying to romance women, many ads fail to draw the line between stereotyping and celebration. That women go gaga over shopping, they are bad at directions, or they love to gossip are now old wine in new bottles. Men can be all that women are and more. Brands need to be relevant to changing times by showing greater consciousness and sensitivity.

Today’s woman has taken major strides to make a mark for herself in the outside world. She is fully aware of her surroundings and takes her own decisions. She can no longer be shown confined to only the kitchen and home, playing passive or docile roles. She also won’t take kindly to her depiction as a sex object and will definitely question the need for skimpily dressed women to market cars or plunging necklines for selling pens. It is a society’s collective responsibility to change the perception of women. In that direction, marketers, advertisers and the media can play a major role in not just reflecting the positive changes taking place around us but also in shaping healthy attitudes and behaviours.

Focus on her being bold and beautiful. She’s more than worth it.

Amul touches the chord with India, yet again

Amul has to sell. Its dream is to enter every home in India. That’s the brand side of the story. What consumers get along the way are not just Amul products — which they may or may not like — but also heart-warming ads and commercials, which are surely lapped up by one and all. The latest to hit the spot is a video titled ‘Har Ghar Amul Ghar’ which endearingly drives home an urban truth — role reversal and Generation Z.

Amul products quietly work their magic into the human psyche through this infomercial which portrays the morning scene at the house of a young couple and their school-going kid. The little boy —  fed well on Amul goodies — is shown to be healthy, independent, intelligent, sensitive, and confident. The ad leaves a deep impact on the audience and Amul, yet again, succeeds in selling a dream.

While positioning itself as a brand, Amul has rarely failed to align itself with the nation’s aspirations and developments — whether social, political, or economical. And it does so innovatively.

The 3.19-minute film touches the consumer in more ways than one, just as the brand’s rural series with their unforgettable and hummable ‘Mero gaam kaatha paarey’. If the previous infomercials hailed women empowerment in villages, ‘Har Ghar Amul Ghar’ raises a toast to young India.

The brand has been reinventing itself only to reiterate what it has been saying since decades —  from ‘Taste of India’ to ‘Amul Doodh Peeta Hain India’, and now ‘Har Ghar Amul Ghar’, its marketing strategy is undoubtedly to get India internalise Amul. If the Amul Girl with her witty taglines is a way to bare the brand’s conscientious side, the latest film makes another smart attempt in that direction. Go watch.

Here it comes — Social advertising at its best!

Talk to your daughter before the beauty industry does! A message that really hits home. One that doesn’t promote an organization’s products but instead introduces a concept to the viewer, pulls at their emotional chords, and leaves them thinking. This is the power of effective social advertising that Dove (no surprises there!) has leveraged with their new campaign Onslaught, which targets the astronomically impossible standards set by beauty industry’s on the perfect woman. All this campaign had to do was tell us something we already know. A nudge, if you must, that puts a whole lot of simple truths into perspective.
This is a new trend we are seeing in the industry. Taking social issues and integrating them into the vision of the organization. This campaign shows the influence branding can have on us. Negative or positive. Every time you go to a store, go for a walk, or are simply reading the papers with your morning cup of tea, you are exposed to thousands of brands which have an overwhelming effect on you subconsciously. This makes it important for all of us to study what our brand says to the audience.
Dove was very clever in the way they downplayed the beauty industry, while being a part of it (for the most part) themselves. But of course Dove knows that every woman is beautiful — with or without make-up. They set themselves apart from an industry which is famous for defining beauty by creating their own definition — a smart move that seems to be hitting the right spots!

Our take home includes a powerful, moving message, which makes us think how much of an impact good advertising has an our minds, an insight into how we need to treat our brands, and of course food for thought the next time we step into a cosmetic store.

When you’re given sour lemons… make lemonade

That’s exactly what Gândul, a daily Romanian newspaper, did when sour news spread that Britain was planning an anti-immigration campaign in Romania and Bulgaria. The campaign would be called – ‘You won’t like it here’.

If you were told you weren’t welcome somewhere, the first and sometimes only reaction would be seeing red. The loud and proud amongst us would call this unwelcoming party names and the stupidly brave might even resort to toilet-papering their front yard. But the really smart ones would respond with a very cheeky and successful ad campaign! Say hello to Gândul’s ‘We may not like Britain, but you’ll love Romania. WHY DON’T YOU COME OVER?’

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The campaign’s ads were placed on Facebook. Further making it a campaign of the people, Romanians on Facebook were urged to submit their own headlines. They could also offer their couches for the arriving British travelers and Romanian companies could offer their vacant jobs. The end result, you ask?

 The campaign increased the newspaper’s readership by 30% and most importantly, it made the British media regret its past discrimination and made the British Government cancel its ridiculous campaign. This brainchild of Romania’s GMP Advertising went on to win a Gold Award at AdStars! And the accolades continue to pour in even today.

 The campaign is mainly based on British stereotypes – the Royal Family, fish n’ chips, the tube, the weather, beer, and really, really high rent! The copy-only campaign cleverly turns these stereotypes on their head and without being overtly insulting, it positions Romania as the better place to be in. Presented as simple red and blue posters with the copy written in white (the colours of Britian) the copy reads as facts. Thereby reminding the readers that the Romanians didn’t have to employ theatrics to sell a very simple idea – the British will love Romania! And so do we!

Catch the emotional bug. Go viral!

Gone are the days when marketing communication revolved around rational appeals and hard sell. Brainwashing your viewer and coercing them into believing your brand identity are looked down upon by the advertising and marketing society, and what has been given greater importance is the art of subtle selling using an emotional appeal.

This emotional appeal plays on the consumers’ social and psychological needs, making them feel for the product and the wonders it can do to their life. And what it also helps do is showcase a positive brand image that is long-lasting and effective!

Playing on this emotional angle and triggering a deep psychological need for love and belonging in its viewers, is the new British Airways Campaign ‘A ticket to see Mum.’ A five-minute video which captures a man’s love for his country, his city, and his family and the angst of his mother who wants to see her son again, the campaign mesmerises and romanticises it users and sends the message: ‘British airways is an airline with a soul.’

Another angle that only adds greater value to the messaging is the concept of a mother’s love – a universal idea that triggers an emotional response across all divides. Juxtaposing British Airways with this concept gives them a unique stand when compared to their contemporaries.

A visual treat with a surprise ending, this trend-setting video is creating waves across the world and has ensured British Airways a spot in every parent’s hearts. Kudos to them!

TRY TAKING THIS TRAIN TOO!

Whether it’s a movie, a book, or a TV show — the romantic soiree between the Mumbai locals and us never really ends. So what really makes Cyrus Daruwala’s book, ‘I Take This Train Too’ different you ask?

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The book isn’t about a love story set amidst the squalid railway platform or a feud between two local underworld groups who operate on trains. This book brings the story of the local train, its people, and their closely intertwined lives alive through comedy and art.

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Two reasons why we love the book: the dynamic illustrations and the satirical voice of the author. This book, hand bound with colourful threads, grabs everyone’s attention from afar. And once it has your attention, there is just no letting go.

The eye-catching illustrations maybe colourful and pop art-esque, but they present a true picture of the local train and its travelling Mumbaikars — in its own quirky yet life-like way! The illustrations are detailed but casual, each a distinct manifestation of an explosively creative mind.

Whether it is ‘Dada’, the man who picks his nose as easily as he picks fights, or ‘Judger’, the old woman by the window who disapproves of everything you do, the illustrations alone give you a clear picture of every character, even what they would smell like. And what only enhances this image is the copy that goes with it — an insightful look into their heads and hearts through the lens of a satirist with the flair for wit, sarcasm, and unforgettable one liners.

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An imaginative and creative ode to the race to survive on the Mumbai local, Cyrus Daruwala takes the art of illustrations to an entire different paradigm with ‘I Take This Train Too’.

It’s time you board the train too!

Onomatopoeia in the ad world!

“Hark, hark!
Bow-wow.
The watch-dogs bark!
Bow-wow.
Hark, hark! I hear
The strain of strutting chanticleer
Cry, ‘cock-a-diddle-dow!'”
(Ariel in William Shakespeare’s The Tempest)

Well, Ariel had it quite simplified for us with all her harking and barking because what she has actually done is exemplified an onomatope. Wikipedia describes “onomatopoeia” as a word that phonetically imitates or suggests the source of the sound that it describes or imitation of a sound. The ‘buzz’ is that almost every other sentence in a conversation contains an onomatope.

For those at a loss of sophisticated words, using an onomatope will definitely brighten up your conversations.

“I am so hungry, I can hear my tummy rumble

Ugh! The road is so dirty”

Splat! The water balloon hit her head”

We would also like to refer to the Late Shammi Kapoor and the Late Kishore Kumar the unofficial ambassadors of omonatopoeia, since they have entertained the public for eons with their “Yahooooooooooo!” & “Yodle Yodle Yooohoo”. Memorable sounds create memorable sounds. Get it? 

Also, advertisers have for a long time used Onomatopoeia to effectively communicate their core message and the characteristic of their products. Almost instantly, this creates a memory for the customer to hold on to. The association with the brand is certainly easier.

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Children, they say, are the best users of onomatopoeia. Well, how many of us haven’t heard something on the lines of:  “The dog kept barking ‘woof woof’ and he ran so fast that ‘thud’ he fell down and then he began crying really loudly ‘waaaaaaaaaaahhh’ and just who hasn’t heard of the famed superheroes eliminating the baddies with their ‘Wham’, ‘Piff’, ‘Pow’, and ‘Crunch’!

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Though, a well known rhetorical question, one might eventually wonder is why onomatopoeia doesn’t sound like what it is?

Have a look at how use of onomatopoeia can effectively communicate a message:

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Here’s a list of other onomatopes:

Hiss , Woof, Buzz, Oink, Meow, Plop, Hiccup, Roar, Chirp, Chug, Tring, Bang, Ding-Dong, Brrriiiinnngggg, Clank.

Go ahead and use them in your creatives!

 

 

 

 

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